Wear your trash?

Hi, this is Geoff.

Let’s jump right in with this week’s Friday Five:

Food-as-medicine: Hippocrates said it (“Let food be thy medicine, and thy medicine be food”), as have permaculturists 🙂 Now, the nonprofit Wholesome Wave is trying to make that general advice specific, literal, and actionable by trying to get “healthcare providers to write prescriptions for produce, rather than just pills.” The program is called FVRx (Fruit and Vegetable Rx), and if successful, has the potential to be a real game-changer.

Unexpected pattern: I could fill a year’s worth of Friday Fives with endless examples of pattern in nature, so you’ll have to grant me just one this week: We’re accustomed to seeing patterns formed by great geological events over “big time,” but about when an animal runs, seemingly “at random?” Check out this incredible photo capture of a dingo running…and what it leaves behind.

Wear your trash: If you’re trying to figure out what to wear tomorrow, Rob Greenfield has some ideas: “The average American creates 4.5 pounds of trash per day, so for 30 days, Rob is going to live just like the average American. The catch? He has to wear every piece of trash he creates. That’s 135 pounds by the end of 30 days.” Rob created a hilarious short film that you can view on his FB page here, and has provided extensive background on the genesis of this creative project on his website. If others follow Rob’s lead, we may suddenly have very heavy people walking around for 30 days, followed by a much lighter load the rest of our lives?

Photos of the year: The Outdoor Photographer of the Year contest has been taking place for the past 6 years. 2016 featured photographers from approximately 50 countries submitting more than 17,000 images. While the overall winner won’t be announced until March 2017, the 8 category finalists have been finalized. A visually rich video featuring the work of these 8 finalists, along with brief commentary on each image, is worth enjoying here.

In case you missed it: A few interesting pieces this week from our sister site, the non-profit Permaculture Research Institute:

If you enjoy these posts, be sure to bookmark the site as several new articles go up weekly, or check out thousands of other past articles, here.

That’s it for the Friday Five. Please remember to share your comments and thoughts in the comments section below.

Cheers, and have a great weekend

Your friend,

Geoff

PS: We’re now starting our 6th week of the 2016-2017 online PDC. For those of you that came on board last week, welcome! And for those that are asking about joining now, yes, you’re more than welcome (I explained why joining “late” is still possible given the course’s unique structure and design here (just scroll all the way to the bottom to read the details on course pedagogy and structure).

BUT, there are limits to joining late (for reasons pertaining to educational value and benefit to you as a student), so sometime (very) soon, I will formally close any further enrollment until our next offering

If interested, enrollment details can be found here.

Otherwise, see you inside the (always free) Permaculture Circle, or next Friday for the 45th installment of the Friday Five.

Have a great weekend, and remember to enjoy the journey…

2017-02-03T11:15:36+00:00 Blog|3 Comments
  • Teresa Kuhl

    Good evening, Geoff!

    Permaculture and sustainable living are subjects near and dear to my heart. I think both my husband and our kitties could benefit from it: My husband is constantly drained during the week, and the cats- especially our male- have a lot of tummy trouble when they get common kibbles. Last week my husband started wondering if they are in fact gluten-intolerant and tried to find a food they would eat that didn’t have corn gluten meal in it. It seems to be working, much to our relief!

    I’ve been collecting plans and ideas to build a sustainable homestead incorporating many of the things you’ve shared. I can’t wait to show you the results!

  • It’s quite crazy how much trash was accumulated by Rob and to think that’s the average… Here’s an example of the total opposite though: http://www.zerowastehome.com/2017/02/whats-in-our-2016-jar-of-annual-waste/ Love how this woman gives tips on how we can minimize the trash we accumulate and the example of having only one small jar of non-recyclable items after a full year is quite impressive.